Weight Loss Tip #1: When to Eat Carbohydrates

For participants in our 8 Weeks to Wellness program we enforce no carbohydrates after 1:00 pm.

This includes: grains, breads, cereals, rice, corn, potatoes, pasta and fruit.
"Close Up Bread" Image courtesy of rakratchada torsap
Allowable food and sources of carbohydrates after 1:00pm include low glycemic index foods, which usually come from come from vegetables.

"Broccoli" Image courtesy of kraifreedom

The reason behind this is that your metabolism starts to slow down after 1:00 pm. Any sugars (carbs) that are ingested after 1:00 pm don’t get burned and thus are stored. If weight loss is your goal, continue exercising and try this weight loss tip.

For any questions please contact one of our doctors or trainers.

Are You Getting the Best Drinking Water?

We All Know Drinking Water is Good For Us

Water filterThe recommendation we follow is to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water every day.  If you are going to drink water, shouldn’t it be healthy? May is National “Drink Water Month.”  Want to make drinking water part of your healthy habits?  At Kambeitz Chiropractic, we have installed a water ionizing and alkalinizing machine for our patients use.  This water has many benefits.  Here are the top four.

  1. Alkaline water is antioxidant water that strengthens your immune system by neutralizing free radicals.  Free radicals are the result of poor diet, stress, pollution, medication etc.
  2. Alkaline water is high pH water.  Did you know that cancer, chronic fatigue, weight gain and many other illnesses thrive within an acidic (low pH) body?
  3. Alkaline water energizes your body by delivering nutrients more efficiently to your body’s cells.
  4. Alkaline water hydrates your body better.  These water molecules are smaller making them up to 6 times more absorbable by your body.

Next time you are in the clinic bring a jug or buy one of ours and try the healthiest water around!

Diet & Exercise Work – If it is Consistent

We recently had an 8 Weeks to Wellness graduate redo their blood work.  Their MD requested a cholesterol panel during a regularly scheduled yearly check up.

Their initial blood cholesterol panel showed highly elevated levels for total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL.  After their 8 week program all markers improved to either normal or near normal.  This was significant as this result was from diet, exercise and supplementation alone.

The values that came back one year after the program were worse than they were before the program!  What does this tell you?  Our program works, but you have apply what you have learned even after the eight weeks.

Change is hard…but do it anyway!  Create a healthy lifestyle, with diet and exercise, and keep working hard to maintain it.  Not just for weeks or months, but years, and your health will benefit.Healthy foods

Broncos Gameday Watch Party/Workout

Does your Sunday football tradition include a couch, seven layer dip, and some football?  But your new years resolution was to get in a great workout five days a week.  So we have an idea for you… watch the game carefully and get in a great workout in the comfort of your living room.  Each time one of the following occurences happen, do the corresponding workout moves.

  • 1st down = 10 jumping jacks
  • Extra point = 10 lunges
  • Field goal = 10 tricep dips
  • Fumble = 10 mountain climbers
  • Interception = 10 burpess with a pushup
  • Kickoff = 10 jumping squats
  • Punt = 10 ice skaters
  • Return = 10 Russian twists
  • Sack = 10 pushups
  • Safety = 20 squats
  • Snap = 5 pushups
  • Touchdown = 30 seconds quick feet

After the game you should feel like the Patriots after a Broncos win!!!

If you have any questions about any of the exercises, be sure to ask Cassie or Troy in the gym for instruction.

Go Broncos!

Good Fats? Bad Fats? Fish Fats?

When people buy fat free foods, to try to keep from becoming fat, and you hear that the fats in nuts and fish are good for you… could that really be true?  They’re still fats after all….

In our fat sensitive world, there is a lot of confusion about fat and our diet.  Today we are going to clear the confusion and help our readers and fans better understand  this important component of our diet.

Eating foods that have fat isn’t going to make you fat.  Poor unbalanced diets make you fat.

The 8 Weeks to Wellness Program Manual explains it best:

Fat does not make you fat. Severely restricting calories, eating loads of high-glycemic-index carbohydrates, and eating poor quality fast (in other words the Standard American Diet) makes you fat.  Therefore over 65% of Americans are indeed fat.  We have no shortage of “fat-free” foods in this country. And yet, we do have a shortage of “fat-free” Americans. Coincidence?…The point being, when we restrict fat, we have to increase something else.  This something else is usually sugar in some form.  Most people do not realize sugar is stored in very small amounts in the body.  Once this storage is filled, the body automatically converts any extra sugar into fat.

(page 27)

Fat has more than twice the calories per gram than carbohydrates or protein.  Fats satiate your hunger and you will not have to eat as much to feel full. (Whereas you have to eat a lot of carbohydrates to feel full.)

Now that we understand where body fat comes from we have to also understand high quality fats and low quality fats.

The best way to plan good fats in your meals are learning to read nutrition labels and understanding the different types of fats.

Bad Fats: Bad fats are used to process foods and extend their shelf lives. These fats are bad for your heart and brain…

Trans fat

Solid Margarine

Hydrogenated Oil

Neutral Fats: These fats have been in the human diet for thousands of years.  While there are associations between saturated fats and heart disease, these fats are okay in moderation for most people.  If you have indicators of heart disease, discuss how much of these neutral fast you should have in your diet, with your Doctor.

Saturated fat

Animal Products

Beef

Cheese

Butter

Coconut Oil

A Steak BBQ
Barbequed steak – a neutral fat

Good Fats: These fats can improve your health by improving blood lipid levels, and have anti-inflammatory properties.

Monosaturated/Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Avocado

Canola Oil

Cold Water Fish (Salmon)

Flax Seed Oil

Olive Oil

Nuts

Fish at a fish market
Fish at a Chilean fish market by S. Striegnitz

The omega-3 fatty acids you find in fish, like salmon, increase the ratio of good fats to bad fats.

When you’re empowered and understand nutrition – good fats and bad fats, and how they affect your health, you can take charge of your health and your weight.

How Calories From Junk Food Equate to Exercise

It’s okay, you can admit it. Sometimes you’re in a hurry and need a quick bite, so you make yourself an excuse for fast food, convenience store food, and say, it’ll be okay. And then another day goes by, and you’re in a hurry, and the same thing happens. Or you need a coffee pick me up, or a happy hour cocktail after a long day. But do you really know what are in these foods? It might surprise you, when you look at the calories, and then compare with how much physical exercise you need to do to burn the calories from this one binge. We put together an infographic comparing a few of these, “junk” food choices to the amount of time needed for a 180 pound person running at a 12 min/mi pace. You might be surprised.

As we say in 8WW – Food is fuel.

The fuel you put into your body will result in either good or poor health…. Food is fuel and we need to understand how the fuel affects our body. Knowledge is not power without critical thinking.  With something as important as nourishing our bodies a little thought can go a long way.  (8WW Program Manual, 21, 23)

Want to learn more about the physical exercise needed to burn the extra calories you eat?  We found the chart from Nutristrategy.com very helpful and detailed.

Infographic comparing junk food to exercise

Have questions we can answer in future articles?  Please ask them in the comments section.

Get More Results With a BIA Measurement

Are you frustrated with not seeing results from your workouts?  There are many reasons for this.  A diagnostic tool that we use in our clinic is called Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA).  It will give us many results of which two are Lean Body Mass and Fat Mass.  This test is done on your initial evaluation so we get an understanding of your percentages.  We also do this test half way through your program.  When we compare week one to week four results we can adjust as needed.  We look at your food choices and your exercise choices to determine which may be the cause of your lack of results.  This a great test that can be done on anybody regardless of their participation in our 8 Weeks to Wellness program.  Please ask for your Bioimpedance Analysis on your next visit!

BIA sensors freeze frame
The sensors used to painlessly conduct the Bioimpedance Analysis
BIA print out freeze frame
The results print out of the “BIA” test. Your doctor will go over the results with you!

A New Flavor of Chicken – Lemon Chicken & Parsley Sauce

Grilled Lemon Chicken with Fresh Parsley SauceIf you’ve gotten a little tired of your routine chicken recipes, you’re in luck.  I stumbled across this recipe on Facebook and just had to try it out this weekend-Grilled Lemon Chicken with Fresh Parsley Sauce.  In preparation for the work week, I made enough for leftovers… and I don’t think I’m going to get tired of it, before I finish them!

What I liked most about this recipe was the number of fresh natural ingredients to make the marinade and sauce, while still having an amazing flavor. Being that we’re in winter, and for a healthier preparation, I grilled the chicken on my Cuisinart Griddler.

To make a healthy lunch or dinner, while participating in the 8WW program, I paired it with broccoli and a fresh salad.  The chicken tenders are the perfect size to get the adequate amount of your healthy fat and protein source, while not overeating.

Enjoy!

Ingredients

Chicken:

  • 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 pounds chicken breast tenders

Sauce:

  • 2/3 cup flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped shallot (about 1/2 shallot)
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • Lemon slices, for garnish

1. Preheat grill.

2. For marinade, zest the entire lemon (yellow part only, about 1 tablespoon), and place zest in a large mixing bowl. Add juice (3 tablespoons) of the lemon to bowl (don’t worry if seeds are also added). Add 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, and sugar; stir to combine. Add chicken tenders; stir to coat with marinade. Set aside to marinate for 15 minutes.

3. While the chicken marinates, make the sauce: Combine all sauce ingredients in a blender. Cover and blend on medium speed until smooth, about 20-30 seconds. Set sauce aside.

4. Using tongs, place marinated chicken on the grill; discard marinade. Cook about 4 minutes; flip the tenders and cook an additional 3-5 minutes or until cooked through. Divide tenders among 6 plates (about 2 tenders each), and drizzle each portion with 1 tablespoon sauce. Garnish with lemon slices. Store leftover sauce, covered, in refrigerator up to 3 days.

This excellent recipe was found on Health.com.

The Good Food Grocery List

One of the biggest lifestyle changes for our 8WW participants is re-shaping their eating habits.  We stress that the key to success is planning.  If you plan your meals in advance, knowing exactly what you will need, when at the grocery store, you will be able to stick to your wellness goals and prevent slip ups in your diet.

Your program manual, and the staff at Kambeitz Chiropractic Health & Wellness PC, will be instrumental to your success with the program.  The manual has a complete section about nutrition to learn how to read labels and plan your meals with appropriate portions of fats, carbohydrates and proteins.  There are suggested recipes and recommendations for snacks.

But if you’re like me, there has to be some order to the grocery list, else you’re running from one side of the store to the other to find ingredients for your menu.  Here is a list we have compiled from the Eight Weeks to Wellness Program Manual with recommended foods and ingredients by grocery store department.

Produce

  • Avocado (fat)
  • Sweet potatoes (carbohydrate)
  • Yams (carbohydrate)
  • Spaghetti squash (carbohydrate)
  • Low GI veggies (carbohydrate): arugula, beets, broccoli, carrots, green peas, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes
  • Low GI fruit (carbohydrate): apples, apricots, blueberries, cantaloupe, cherries, grapefruit, green grapes, kiwi, mango, orange, papaya, peach, pear, pineapple, prunes, strawberries, watermelon
  • Salad: romaine lettuce, cucumbers, carrots, cabbage, beans, onions (carbohydrate)

Frozen Foods

  • Frozen berries
  • Frozen mixed veggies

 

Dairy

  • Eggs (protein)
  • Plain Greek Yogurt (protein)
  • Skim or low fat cottage cheese (protein)
  • Milk: skim, low fat lactaid, plain soy milk, almond milk
  • Fat free or low fat shredded or sliced cheese (protein)

 

Bakery

  • Bread: stone ground whole wheat, pumpernickel, multi 9-grain (carbohydrate)
  • Lite English muffins (carbohydrate)
  • Whole wheat tortillas (carbohydrate)

 

Meat

  • Sandwich meat: low fat ham or turkey (fat & protein)
  • Fish: Tuna, Salmon (fat & protein)
  • Meats: organic grassfed meats; chicken, turkey breast, white lean pork (fat & protein)

 

Dry Packaged Goods

  • Nuts: walnuts, pecans, peanuts, almonds, pistachios (fat)
  • Seeds: flax, sunflower, pumpkin (fat)
  • Whole wheat pasta (carbohydrate)
  • High Fiber Cereal (carbohydrate)
  • Brown Rice (carbohydrate)
  • Basmati (carbohydrate)
  • Quinoa (carbohydrate)
  • Natural peanut butter
  • Bars: Zone, Balance, Luna or Ultrameal
  • Soups: homemade or Campbell Soup Select, Progresso Soup brands, “non-cream”; vegetable, minestrone, lentil
  • Cereals: Muesli, Oatmeal, All Bran (carbohydrate)
  • Canned or Dry Beans: lentil, black, navy, kidney (protein & carbohydrate)

Baking supplies

  • Whole wheat flour (carbohydrate)
  • Truvia or Purvia sweeteners (carbohydrate)

 

Condiments

  • Hummus
  • Annie’s Natural salad dressings
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • Olive or canola oil

 

Drinks

  • Tomato juice
  • Flavored seltzer water
  • Coffee (use Truvia or Purvia sweeteners)
  • Tea (use Truvia or Purvia sweeteners)
A healthy grab from the grocery store, complete with items from our grocery list.

Cebiche!

One of my favorite dishes that I’ve made and ordered when traveling around the world is cebiche.  And with the variety of veggies, I thought it would be perfect to share for some 8WW diet inspiration.

Cebiche, if you’re not familiar, “is typically made from fresh raw fish marinated in citrus juices, such as lemon or lime, and spiced with ají or chili peppers. Additional seasonings, such as chopped onions, salt, and coriander, may also be added” (wikipedia).

Being that we’re in Colorado fresh fish is harder to come by.  When I’m itching to make a cebiche here in Colorado, I usually make a shrimp cebiche.  (In order to ensure that the shrimp, which was not caught that day, is free from bacteria, I always put it in for a quick boil as is recommended.  The acids from the lemons and limes will cook the shrimp but it won’t kill the bacteria.) I first made it from this recipe from simplyrecipes.com, which has always remained a tried and true recipe to follow.  It makes for a great leftover as it continues to marinate!

A bowl of shrimp cebiche
A bowl of cebiche made with the following recipe

Shrimp Ceviche Recipe

If you find the ceviche a little too acidic, drain out some of the juices after the marinating, add a little more avocado (or some olive oil) and/or a little more salt.

Ingredients

1 pound medium-small shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 Tbsp salt
3/4 cup lime juice (juice from 4-6 limes)
3/4 cup lemon juice (juice from 2-3 lemons)
1 cup finely chopped red onion
1 serrano chile, ribs and seeds removed, minced
1 cup chopped cilantro
1 cucumber, peeled diced into 1/2-inch pieces
1 avocado, peeled, seed removed, cut into 1/2-inch chunks

1 In a large pot, bring to a boil 4 quarts of water, salted with 2 Tbsp salt. Add the shrimp and cook for 1 minute to 2 minutes max, depending on size of shrimp. (Over-cooking the shrimp will turn it rubbery.) Remove shrimp with a slotted spoon and place into a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking.

2 Drain the shrimp. Cut each piece of shrimp in half, or into inch-long pieces. Place shrimp in a glass or ceramic bowl. Mix in the lime and lemon juice. Cover and refrigerate for a half hour.

3 Mix in the chopped red onion and serrano chile. Refrigerate an additional half hour.

4 Right before serving, add the cilantro, cucumber, and avocado.

Yield: Serves 4-6.